The Playlist

When Jack Pringle, the spoilt and out of control son of one of Cape Town’s wealthiest families is forced by his father to join Maria Alexopoulos on a road trip, he has no idea what he’s in for. Jack’s recent antics have landed him in serious trouble, and he must comply with his father’s rules or he will end up penniless, something he is not used to.

Maria, the head Project Manager for an NGO called Water for All is about to start her final journey across South Africa to close out her projects and tie up some loose ends. Maria’s recent personal loss and grief make her less than tolerant of Jack, a man twenty years her junior. Unfortunately, she must take Jack with her to appease his father, the NGO’s main donor.

The journey, told with music, across the barren and beautiful countryside will test their resolve, ability to heal and connect. When they are stripped of all they believe they should be, can Maria and Jack find their truth under the African stars.

R350,00

Customer Reviews

5/5

I liked the characters and the story that Melina Lewis brings to life in this, her fourth, adult novel. The main protagonists felt like people I might know in real life, and I enjoyed the will-they-won’t-they tension between them. The road trip through the remote landscapes of South Africa was described in evocative ways, and it made me miss the dust and the night sky in that countryside. Recommended for your entertainment.”

5/5

“Journeys can be great vehicles for storytelling, as this novel proves. Juxtaposing a road trip through southern Africa and the inner journeys of her two main characters, author Melina Lewis takes readers on an adventurous—at times, contentious—ride across the countryside, through villages, and into the fractured hearts and minds of Maria and Jack. There are many layers to the book, including ageism, addiction, privilege, grief, denial, music and corruption. I enjoy stories that examine relationships across generations and which celebrate how much we can learn from people older and younger than ourselves. This was one of my favourite themes in The Playlist. It’s a compelling story about consequences, compassion, and healing. I thoroughly enjoyed the journey. ”